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April 25, 2014

Parole/Pardon Board Hearings

Information related to Parole and Pardon Board hearings

Parole Board and the Pardon Board hearings are public, and victims/survivors have the right to attend and testify.

Law requires that written notice of both parole and pardon hearings must be mailed to victims no less than thirty days prior to the hearing date. If victims do not receive adequate notice, they may ask that the hearing be rescheduled.

Law also provides that victims may testify before the Parole Board and the Pardon Board by telephone from the office of the local district attorney. Arrangements need to be made in advance. Victims may contact the appropriate board or their district attorney’s office about this matter.

Both Parole and Pardon Board dockets and docket outcomes are posted on the Department’s website.

Parole Board hearings

Almost all hearings by the Parole Board are conducted via teleconference. Three-member panels of the Board hold hearings from the Headquarters complex in Baton Rouge.

Offenders are not transported to meet the board directly but testify from the closest state prison or, occasionally, from a parish facility. An offender’s opponents may choose to participate by going to the location where Parole Board members sit or to the institution where the offender will testify. An offender’s supporters are encouraged to go where the offender is.

During hearings at state prison sites, staff makes every effort to ensure that victims and their supporters remain apart from the offender and his or her supporters. Someone is available to answer victims’ questions related to board hearings at that site. Names of those persons are available by contacting the Crime Victims Services Bureau.

Pardon Board hearings

The five-member Pardon Board holds all of its hearings from the First Circuit Court of Appeals building in Baton Rouge.

Offenders are not transported to meet the board directly but testify from the closest state prison or, occasionally, from a parish facility. Opponents and supporters of offenders being considered by the Pardon Board are allowed to testify directly only from the court building in Baton Rouge, not from the facility where the inmate is.

Pardon Board staff and correctional officers at the First Circuit site make every effort to make all parties comfortable, seating those with opposing views in separate areas and allowing them to leave the hearings at different intervals.

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